New DARPA-Funded Tech Promises To Diagnose COVID-19 Through Implantable Biochip

image via mintpressnews


We have reported on Bill Gates working with Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) to produce a nano-tech vaccine, as well as a microchip to allegedly detect COVID-19, which we know the chip is for far more than that. Now, there’s an update on DARPA funding a microchip to diagnose the disease. A new mRNA diagnostic tool developed at Stanford University and funded by BARDA and DARPA is bringing implantable biochip technology closer to reality.

Raul Diego (mintpressnews)has the story.

The POC (point-of-care) diagnostics market stands at about $18.8 billion globally, according to recent market trends, and is expected to grow by a third to $24.1 billion this year and projected to explode by 2024 to $46.7 billion. The main driver for these highly optimistic forecasts is the surge in healthcare technology demand brought on by the pandemic crisis, which is lining the pockets of big pharma and big tech, aided and abetted by the Defense Department’s various tentacles into the private sector, like DARPA or In-Q-Tel, where federal dollars are channeled into private enterprise through direct investment, stock purchasing, and grants, representing one of the clearest examples of how the military industrial complex works.


The “detection” of COVID-19 is among the most crowded segments of the POC diagnostics market and recent advances in the life sciences have made new technologies, such as mRNA-based vaccines and testing possible. The U.S. government, through the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), has been intimately involved in helping these technologies along, and in the case of mRNA, specifically, has made considerable investments in its development dating back to November 2019 in the case of one company developing an mRNA-based COVID-19 diagnostic tool.

But in a paper published on the FDA’s website, independent journalist Jon Rappaport discovered that the CDC – at least in the summer of 2020 – had no virus isolates of the novel coronavirus “currently available” and reveals that all the assays used to design diagnostic testing algorithms for COVID-19 were of other isolates meant to “mimic clinical specimen.”

In other words, the tests aren’t designed to detect COVID-19 at all, which raises a number of questions, including why the Defense Advanced Research Agency (DARPA) just awarded $1.1 million to a molecular diagnostic firm that is working on a machine-learning diagnostic test for COVID-19, that uses mRNA biomarkers to read the immune system’s response.

A DARPA-Funded Implantable Biochip to Detect COVID-19 Could Hit Markets by 2021




Think your friends would be interested? Share this story!

No comments

Leave Your Comment